Welcome To The Bowie Library Media Center (LMC)

Upcoming Books In The Bowie Library

  • It's a Round, Round World!

    by Ellie Peterson Year Published: 2019

    Intrepid young scientist-adventurer Joulia Copernicus takes readers on a journey through space and time, explaining with humor and wit howe we know the earth is round.

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  • Rafi and Rosi Music!

    by Lulu Delacre Year Published: 2019 E DEL

    In this new book in the popular Dive Into Reading: Rafi and Rosi chapter book series, Rafi and his younger sister, Rosi, are excited to learn about and participate in the traditional forms of music of their native Puerto Rico. They drum and dance to the rolling and rippling beats of bomba instruments. They sing and sway with the rhythms of plena songs. And they attend a party where they eat paella and warm corn fritters and dance to the hot, spicy beat of la salsa!   Engaging and informative, the book is perfect for independent readers in kindergarten through second grade. Children will enjoy joining Rafi and Rosi on their new adventures while they learn about Puerto Rico's musical traditions and culture.

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  • Douglas

    by Randy Cecil Year Published: 2019

    When Iris Espinosa goes to the cinema, she doesn’t expect to meet a small mouse. And she certainly doesn’t expect that mouse to stow away in her sweater pocket. At home, Iris is delighted by the mouse’s daring, which reminds her of the actor Douglas Fairbanks. And so begin the adventures of a sweet, plucky mouse named Douglas, who must overcome obstacles aplenty, from hungry cats to broom-wielding humans, as she journeys across the tall rooftops of Bloomville to return to her movie-theater home. Full of high-stakes chases, clever escapes, and valiant rescues, Randy Cecil’s story is a cinematic and meticulously crafted celebration of courage and friendship.

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  • Home in the Woods

    by Eliza Wheeler Year Published: 2019

    Eliza Wheeler’s gorgeously illustrated book tells the story of what happens when six-year-old Marvel, her seven siblings, and their mom must start all over again after their father has died. Deep in the woods of Wisconsin they find a tar-paper shack. It doesn’t seem like much of a home, but they soon start seeing what it could be. During their first year it’s a struggle to maintain the shack and make sure they have enough to eat. But each season also brings its own delights and blessings—and the children always find a way to have fun. Most importantly, the family finds immense joy in being together, surrounded by nature. And slowly, their little shack starts feeling like a true home—warm, bright, and filled up with love.

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  • Remarkables

    by Margaret Peterson Haddix Year Published: 2019

    One minute they’re there, laughing and having fun at the house next door. The next minute the teens are gone. Like magic. Marin can’t believe her eyes. Who are they? Can anyone else see them? What makes them so happy? Marin is lonely in this new town of hers and eager to figure out more. Then she meets Charley, who reveals that he knows about them, too. He calls them the “Remarkables.” Charley warns her to stay away from the Remarkables—and him. Charley and Marin both have painful secrets they’re holding on to, but could solving the mystery of the Remarkables help them? How can they ever get any answers if whenever they’re too close, the Remarkables instantly disappear…?

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  • Soccerverse: Poems About Soccer

    by Elizabeth Steinglass Year Published: 2019

    From the coach who inspires players to fly like the wind, to the shin guard that begs to be donned, to soccer dreams that fill the night, Soccerverse celebrates soccer. Featuring a diverse cast of girls and boys, the poems in this collection cover winning, losing, teamwork, friendships, skills, good sportsmanship, and, most of all, love for the game. Elizabeth Steinglass cleverly incorporates thirteen different poetic forms throughout the book, defining each in a note at the end, and Edson Ikê’s bold artwork is as creative as the poems are surprising.

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  • Malamander

    by Thomas Taylor Year Published: 2019

    It’s winter in the town of Eerie-on-Sea, where the mist is thick and the salt spray is rattling the windows of the Grand Nautilus Hotel. Inside, young Herbert Lemon, Lost and Founder for the hotel, has an unexpected visitor. It seems that Violet Parma, a fearless girl around his age, lost her parents at the hotel when she was a baby, and she’s sure that the nervous Herbert is the only person who can help her find them. The trouble is, Violet is being pursued at that moment by a strange hook-handed man. And the town legend of the Malamander — a part-fish, part-human monster whose egg is said to make dreams come true — is rearing its scaly head. As various townspeople, some good-hearted, some nefarious, reveal themselves to be monster hunters on the sly, can Herbert and Violet elude them and discover what happened to Violet’s kin? This lighthearted, fantastical mystery, featuring black-and-white spot illustrations, kicks off a trilogy of fantasies set in the seaside town.

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  • Super Potato's Mega Time-Travel Adventure

    by Artur Laperla Year Published: 2019

    For Super Potato's future...he must travel to the past! After an evil villain turned the handsome crime fighter Super Max into Super Potato, our hero got used to life as a tiny tuber. He even threw out his expensive shampoos. But when friendly scientists offer Super Potato a trip back in time, he can't resist. It's a chance to stop his transformation from ever happening! Super Potato lands in the past, ready to change history. There's just one problem: he runs into another fiendish criminal, Archibald the Scaly. Yikes! What will Super Potato choose―living life as a human or stopping Archibald's sinister plans?

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  • Soldier for Equality: José de la Luz Sáenz and the Great War

    by Duncan Tonatiuh Year Published: 2019

    José de la Luz Sáenz believed in fighting for what was right. Although he was born in the United States, he and his family experienced prejudice because of their Mexican heritage. When World War I broke out, Luz volunteered to join the fight. Because of his ability to quickly learn languages, he became part of the Intelligence Office in Europe. However, despite his hard work and intellect, Luz often didn’t receive credit for his contributions. Upon his return to the US, he joined other Mexican-Americans whom he had met in the army to fight for equality. His contribution, along with others, ultimately led to the creation of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), which is the oldest Latino civil rights organization. Soldier for Equality is based in part on Luz’s diary during the war. It includes a biography of Luz’s later years, an author’s note, a timeline, a bibliography, and an index.

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